Book Recommendation of the Week: Amelia Anne is Dead and Gone by Kat Rosenfield

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Hey guys, apologies for the hiatus. Have had some real-life stuff going on plus I am also working on revamping the blog design some. Thank you for your patience. Things should go back as usual now.

 

Picture Source: Goodreads.com
Picture Source: Goodreads.com

 

 

This week’s book recommendation is Amelia Anne is Dead and Gone by Kat Rosenfield. If you like small towns, beautiful writing, deep and complex characters, and mystery, this is the book for you.

 

Intrigued?

An arresting un-coming-of-age story, from a breathtaking talent.

Becca has always longed to break free from her small, backwater hometown. But the discovery of an unidentified dead girl on the side of a dirt road sends the town–and Becca–into a tailspin. Unable to make sense of the violence of the outside world creeping into her backyard, Becca finds herself retreating inward, paralyzed from moving forward for the first time in her life.

Short chapters detailing the last days of Amelia Anne Richardson’s life are intercut with Becca’s own summer as the parallel stories of two young women struggling with self-identity and relationships on the edge twist the reader closer and closer to the truth about Amelia’s death.

 

 

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Book Recommendation of the Week: Eve by Anna Carey

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Picture Source: Goodreads.com

 

This week’s book recommendation is Eve by Anna Carey. This was one I’d been really excited to read and it didn’t disappoint. It’s a post apocalyptic book concerning the aftermath of a plague and a twisted plan for the females that remain. It’s also a series, so if you enjoy the first, you might want to check the rest out. I haven’t gotten to them yet, but I definitely want to.

Intrigued?

Where do you go when nowhere is safe?

Sixteen years after a deadly virus wiped out most of Earth’s population, the world is a perilous place. Eighteen-year-old Eve has never been beyond the heavily guarded perimeter of her school, where she and two hundred other orphaned girls have been promised a future as the teachers and artists of the New America. But the night before graduation, Eve learns the shocking truth about her school’s real purpose and the horrifying fate that awaits her.

Fleeing the only home she’s ever known, Eve sets off on a long, treacherous journey, searching for a place she can survive. Along the way she encounters Arden, her former rival from school, and Caleb, a rough, rebellious boy living in the wild. Separated from men her whole life, Eve has been taught to fear them, but Caleb slowly wins her trust… and her heart. He promises to protect her, but when soldiers begin hunting them, Eve must choose between true love and her life.

In this epic new series, Anna Carey imagines a future that is both beautiful and terrifying.

 

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Book Recommendation of the Week: Matched by Ally Condie

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Picture Source: Goodreads.com
Picture Source: Goodreads.com

This week’s book recommendation is Matched by Ally Condie. Matched is kind of similar to one of my favorites, The Giver, though there’s more of an emphasis on love/romance. But Cassia also begins to realize that her perfect seeming society isn’t all that it’s cracked up to be. I love books that are set in these “perfect” type of societies only for the main character to discover otherwise. This is also one of the few books I’ve come across that presents a successful love triangle. If you like dystopian books about flawed, controlling societies and romances, you’ll love this one.

 

Intrigued?

Cassia has always trusted the Society to make the right choices for her: what to read, what to watch, what to believe. So when Xander’s face appears on-screen at her Matching ceremony, Cassia knows with complete certainty that he is her ideal mate… until she sees Ky Markham’s face flash for an instant before the screen fades to black.

The Society tells her it’s a glitch, a rare malfunction, and that she should focus on the happy life she’s destined to lead with Xander. But Cassia can’t stop thinking about Ky, and as they slowly fall in love, Cassia begins to doubt the Society’s infallibility and is faced with an impossible choice: between Xander and Ky, between the only life she’s known and a path that no one else has dared to follow.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Book Recommendation of the Week: Shark Girl by Kelly Bingham

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Picture Source: Goodreads.com

 

This week’s book recommendation is Shark Girl by Kelly Bingham. I love all things shark-related.  Shark survivor stories always fill me with a certain kind of hope. This is the first verse-novel that I ever read. It ended up being a fast and enjoyable read about a fifteen-year-old girl struggling to adapt after losing her arm in a shark attack.

 

Intrigued?

A teenager struggles through physical loss to the start of acceptance in an absorbing, artful novel at once honest and insightful, wrenching and redemptive.

On a sunny day in June, at the beach with her mom and brother, fifteen-year-old Jane Arrowood went for a swim. And then everything — absolutely everything — changed. Now she’s counting down the days until she returns to school with her fake arm, where she knows kids will whisper, “That’s her — that’s Shark Girl,” as she passes.

In the meantime there are only questions: Why did this happen? Why her? What about her art? What about her life? In this striking first novel, Kelly Bingham uses poems, letters, telephone conversations, and newspaper clippings to look unflinchingly at what it’s like to lose part of yourself – and to summon the courage it takes to find yourself again.

 

 

 

 

 

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Book Recommendation of the Week: Petals on the Wind by V.C. Andrews

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Picture Source: Goodreads.com
Picture Source: Goodreads.com

This week’s book recommendation is Petals on the Wind by V.C. Andrews. By now, my VCA obsession is probably no secret, but since this one of my absolute top favorites and the Lifetime movie premieres on May 26th, I thought it might make for a good recommendation. My plan is to re-read this before I watch the movie so I can not only enjoy re-reading the book again, but also so I can more accurately compare it to the movie for the Book vs Movie post.

Petals on the Wind is far from perfect, but it’s hard to find critical faults with books you love. While I admit there is definitely some troubling events in the book, it’s like a train wreck–I can’t tear my eyes away! It’s like a really crazy soap opera. So if you like soap operas, steel-tough yet still very flawed protagonists, dark family secrets, revenge stories, and plenty of twisted relationships, then this is definitely the book for you! I do recommend you reading Flowers in the Attic, the first book in this series, before so you won’t be as confused.

 

Intrigued?

They were such brave children to withstand such suffering. Such clever children to escape such terror!

For Carrie, Chris and Cathy, the attic was a dark horror that would not leave their minds, even while they built bright, promising new lives. Of course mother had to pretend they didn’t exist.

And Grandmother was convinced they had the devil in them.

But that wasn’t their fault. Was it? Cathy knew what to do.

She now had the powers she had learned from her beautiful mother. She knew it in the way her brother still yearned for her, in the way her guardian touched her, in the way all men looked at her.

She knew it was time to put what she knew to the test. To show her mother and grandmother that the pain and terror of the attic could not be forgotten… Show them.

Show them—once and for all.

 

 

 

 

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Book Recommendation of the Week: It Came From Ohio: My Life As A Writer by R.L. Stine, Joe Arthur

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Picture Source: Goodreads.com
Picture Source: Goodreads.com

This week’s book recommendation is It Came From Ohio: My Life As A Writer by R.L. Stine, Joe Arthur. I don’t typically recommend biographies/autobiographies, but if you’ve ever been a fan of R.L. Stine and his books, it’s a must-read. This is one of the books that cemented my desire to become a writer. While many things attribute to my love for writing, R.L. Stine holds a special place. And reading about his childhood and find a few things in common with him gave me even more confidence to keep at it. Plus the man has a pretty interesting life. I just found out recently that there is a similar book for the Goosebumps Illustrator called It Came from New Jersey: My Life as an Artist by Tim Jacobus that I’m dying to read.

 

Intrigued?

A best-selling author tells kids everything they ever wanted to know about him–and Goosebumps! What was R.L. Stine like as a kid? How did he start writing books? Where does he get all his scary ideas? These and many more questions are answered in this humorous, fast-paced biography. Photos, line drawings.

 

 

 

 

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Book Recommendation of the Week: The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

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Picture Source: Goodreads.com
Picture Source: Goodreads.com

This week’s book recommendation is The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald. Considered an American classic. Definitely worth a read at least once in your life.

Intrigued?

In 1922, F. Scott Fitzgerald announced his decision to write “something new—something extraordinary and beautiful and simple + intricately patterned.” That extraordinary, beautiful, intricately patterned, and above all, simple novel became The Great Gatsby, arguably Fitzgerald’s finest work and certainly the book for which he is best known. A portrait of the Jazz Age in all of its decadence and excess, Gatsby captured the spirit of the author’s generation and earned itself a permanent place in American mythology.

Self-made, self-invented millionaire Jay Gatsby embodies some of Fitzgerald’s—and his country’s—most abiding obsessions: money, ambition, greed, and the promise of new beginnings. “Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgiastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that’s no matter—tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther…. And one fine morning—” Gatsby’s rise to glory and eventual fall from grace becomes a kind of cautionary tale about the American Dream.

It’s also a love story, of sorts, the narrative of Gatsby’s quixotic passion for Daisy Buchanan. The pair meet five years before the novel begins, when Daisy is a legendary young Louisville beauty and Gatsby an impoverished officer. They fall in love, but while Gatsby serves overseas, Daisy marries the brutal, bullying, but extremely rich Tom Buchanan. After the war, Gatsby devotes himself blindly to the pursuit of wealth by whatever means—and to the pursuit of Daisy, which amounts to the same thing. “Her voice is full of money,” Gatsby says admiringly, in one of the novel’s more famous descriptions.

His millions made, Gatsby buys a mansion across Long Island Sound from Daisy’s patrician East Egg address, throws lavish parties, and waits for her to appear. When she does, events unfold with all the tragic inevitability of a Greek drama, with detached, cynical neighbor Nick Carraway acting as chorus throughout. Spare, elegantly plotted, and written in crystalline prose, The Great Gatsby is as perfectly satisfying as the best kind of poem.

 

 

 

 

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