The Book vs the Movie: Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

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Book written by J.K. Rowling, 2003
Movie directed by David Yates, 2007

Synopsis from Goodreads.com:

 

Harry Potter is due to start his fifth year at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. His best friends Ron and Hermione have been very secretive all summer and he is desperate to get back to school and find out what has been going on. However, what Harry discovers is far more devastating than he could ever have expected…

 

 

Picture Source: Goodreads.com
Picture Source: Goodreads.com

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Picture Source: IMDB.com
Picture Source: IMDB.com

 

Which I Viewed First: The book.

Which I Enjoyed Most: Both.

Out of 5 stars, the Book Gets: 5 stars.

Out of 5 stars, the Movie Gets: 5 stars.

Things the Book Did Better: More details regarding the plot and back story, more scenes involving Dobby.Liked how the prophecy was revealed better. Ron’s character also seemed to grow more than in the movie.

Things the Movie Did Better:  Liked how it started at the playground, loved who they cast for Luna, scene with the department of ministries seemed more powerful, as well as the scene with Bellatrix and Sirius. Scenes with Umbridge also were more entertaining and the actress made her an even more annoying character.

Verdict?: Book, although the movie was pretty good.

Why?: I love both for different reasons, though I feel the movie was more entertaining overall. The newly casted characters and the special effects make the original idea shine.

Should the movie be re-made?: No.

What do you think? Agree, disagree? Would love to hear your thoughts!

 

jncname

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Book Review–A Mango-shaped Space by Wendy Mass

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This is the 10th book from my 115 in 2015 Reading Challenge.

 

Picture Source: Goodreads.com
Picture Source: Goodreads.com

A Mango-shaped Space by Wendy Mass
Published January 1st, 2005 by Little, Brown Books for Young Readers

Mia Winchell has synesthesia, the mingling of perceptions whereby a person can see sounds, smell colors, or taste shapes. Forced to reveal her condition, she must look to herself to develop an understanding and appreciation of her gift in this coming-of-age novel.

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 As a creative person, I am fascinated by synesthesia. Have been ever since I read R.J. Anderson’s Ultraviolet and learned that it was a real thing. <–I also highly recommend that book if you are at all interested in synesthesia and if you liked this book.

Plot:

The plot is a coming-of-age one, which I love. While I suspected Mango’s later fate, for the most part the plot kept me on my toes. There really wasn’t much to the plot, but there also didn’t need to be.

Setting:

I could relate to the setting, which is out in the country. I grew up in a similar sounding place, so in a way I felt like I was back home. It was very accurate.

Characters:

I like that the characters in this actually felt like a real people. They all had flaws.

Mia, the main character, has synesthesia. The author did a great job showing how it benefited and made life harder for her. She felt like a real 13-year-old, too–kind of silly, creative, intro personal but not super quiet. I liked her and felt I could relate to her well.

I liked her entire family, actually, especially Mango the cat.

I also enjoyed Roger, one of Mia’s classmates, and Billy, a small boy who touches Mia’s life.

Relationships:

The relationships between the family members and Mia, as well as with one another, are realistic. I particularly like the one between Mia and her little brother.

Mia also has an interesting relationship with her friend, Jenna. Jenna was hard for me to warm up to, but ended up being likable.

Roger and Mia’s relationship was pretty cute. I would have liked to see how that evolved over the next few years.

Writing/Voice:

The writing and voice definitely sound like a young girl who is Mia’s age. The descriptions were all very well done, almost to the point to where I could see what Mia was.

Ending:

When I read the title and tied it in to the character, I suspected how things might eventually end. What I didn’t suspect was how hard it would come at me. Maybe it’s because of my own loss last year with my own furbabies, but the end just tore me apart. Very emotional.

Overall:

Overall this was a pretty good read and I would recommend it, especially for the target audience.

 

3halfstars

 

 

jncname

The Book vs the Movie: Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

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Book written by J.K. Rowling, 2000
Movie directed by Mike Newell, 2005

Synopsis from Goodreads.com:

 

The summer holidays are dragging on and Harry Potter can’t wait for the start of the school year. It is his fourth year at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry and there are spells to be learnt and (unluckily) Potions and Divination lessons to be attended. But Harry can’t know that the atmosphere is darkening around him, and his worst enemy is preparing a fate that it seems will be inescapable …With characteristic wit, fast-paced humour and marvelous emotional depth, J.K. Rowling has proved herself yet again to be a master story-teller

 

 

Picture Source: Goodreads.com
Picture Source: Goodreads.com

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Picture Source: Amazon.com
Picture Source: Amazon.com

 

Which I Viewed First: The book.

Which I Enjoyed Most: The book.

Out of 5 stars, the Book Gets: 5 stars.

Out of 5 stars, the Movie Gets: 4.5 stars.

Things the Book Did Better: The Qudditch World Cup, Dumbledore handled the goblet of fire incident better, Rita Skeeter’s “secret” (left out in the movie), More details concerning Barty Crouch, Dobby is featured, final confrontation scene was stronger.

Things the Movie Did Better: The twins fighting after failing to fool the goblet addition, the ferret scene is even funnier, Harry/Hermione relationship seems stronger, Neville playing a more active role, Barty Crouch Sr is more likable, Moaning Myrtle’s scene was hilarious.

Verdict?: Book, although the movie was pretty good.

Why?: Even though I enjoyed the movie, I liked the book better because there was more details about certain things, such as the Quidditch World Cup. I also felt the last confrontation between Harry and Voldemort was stronger in the book. I enjoyed a lot of the movie’s additions, though.

Should the movie be re-made?: Nah.

What do you think? Agree, disagree? Would love to hear your thoughts!

 

jncname

The Book vs the Movie: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

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Book written by J.K. Rowling, 1999
Movie directed by Alfonso Cuarón, 2004

Synopsis from Goodreads.com:

 

Harry Potter is lucky to reach the age of thirteen, since he has already survived the murderous attacks of the feared Dark Lord on more than one occasion. But his hopes for a quiet term concentrating on Quidditch are dashed when a maniacal mass-murderer escapes from Azkaban, pursued by the soul-sucking Dementors who guard the prison. It’s assumed that Hogwarts is the safest place for Harry to be. But is it a coincidence that he can feel eyes watching him in the dark, and should he be taking Professor Trelawney’s ghoulish predictions seriously?

 

 

Picture Source: Goodreads.com
Picture Source: Goodreads.com

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Picture Source: imdb.com
Picture Source: imdb.com

 

Which I Viewed First: The book.

Which I Enjoyed Most: Both, honestly.

Out of 5 stars, the Book Gets: 5 stars.

Out of 5 stars, the Movie Gets: 5 stars.

Things the Book Did Better: The scene with Snape ranting to Harry about his father, which didn’t make it to the movie. The friendship between Sirius and Crookshanks, which I always enjoyed, is also cut. I also felt that the dangerous vibe concerning Sirius Black was stronger in the book.

Things the Movie Did Better: Hogmeade sounded pretty awesome in the books, but when it was shown in the movies, it was even better. I also like the snowball scene better than the original book scene that involved mud, Hermione and Ron’s budding relationship (not shown in the book). Loved the shrunken head on the bus, which wasn’t in the books.

Verdict?: Both.

Why?: Like the first two, I feel the books adapted well to the big screen, as well as additions that almost make me want to like the movie just a little bit better.

Should the movie be re-made?: No way!

What do you think? Agree, disagree? Would love to hear your thoughts!

 

jncname

Book Review–The Abominable Snowman of Pasadena (Goosebumps #38) by R.L. Stine

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This is the 97th book from my 114 in 2014 Reading Challenge.

 

Picture Source: Goodreads.com
Picture Source: Goodreads.com

The Abominable Snowman of Pasadena (Goosebumps #38) by R.L. Stine
Published 1995 by Scholastic

 

FORGET FROSTY!

Jordan Blake and his sister, Nicole, are sick of the hot weather in Pasadena. Just once they’d like to have a real winter. A real winter with real snow.

And then it happens. The Blakes are off to Alaska! Seems that Mr. Blake has been asked to photograph a mysterious snow creature there.

Poor Jordan and Nicole. They just wanted to see snow. But now they’re being chased by a monstrous creature. A big furry-faced creature…known as the Abominable Snowman!

 

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Not one of my favorites, but still a fun winter-themed read. I thought the snowball twist was a nice touch.

 

 

3stars

 

 

 

 

 

jncname

Book Review–The Forgotten (Animorphs #11) by Katherine Applegate

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This is the 94th book from my 114 in 2014 Reading Challenge.

 

Picture Source: Goodreads.com
Picture Source: Goodreads.com

The Forgotten (Animorphs #11) by Katherine Applegate
Published October 1st, 1997 by Scholastic Inc

 

There’s been an accident. Someone crash-landed a Yeerk Bug fighter. And the Yeerks have been trying to cover it up – quickly. But not before Tobias spots it. So the Animorphs and Ax decide to steal the ship to show the world that Earth has been invaded.

 

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Probably the most pointless in the series so far. The new setting was cool, but at the end, I was kind of mad at how things turned out. It made very little sense and doesn’t seem to add to the series at all. The only positive thing I get out of it is Jake’s character development, but that could have been done without the lame plot. I hope there aren’t anymore books like this one later in the series.

 

 

2stars

 

 

 

jncname

Book Review–The Android (Animorphs #10) by Katherine Applegate

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This is the 88th book from my 114 in 2014 Reading Challenge.

 

Picture Source: Goodreads.com
Picture Source: Goodreads.com

The Android (Animorphs #10) by Katherine Applegate
Published September 1st, 1997 by Scholastic, Inc.

 

When Marco runs into his old friend Erek he doesn’t think too much of it. He’s got a couple of more important things to do. Like helping to save the world. But then Marco finds out Erek’s been hanging with some of the kids at The Sharing. And he starts to think that something just a little weird is going on.

 

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This one was a little difficult for me to read because it involved spiders–one of the animals I absolutely cannot stand. They just freak me out.

However, this was still a good book. Not one of my favorites in the series, but interesting. It also has a plot point that will probably tie into some later stuff. I liked the idea of the history of the dogs.

I’m glad to not be turning anymore pages with a spider staring at me in the bottom corner, though!

 

 

3stars

 

 

 

jncname